Menu

Blog

Archive for the ‘physics’ category

Nov 26, 2021

New hypothesis argues the universe simulates itself into existence

Posted by in categories: physics, space

A physics paper proposes neither you nor the world around you are real.

Nov 24, 2021

Lightwave-driven scanning tunneling spectroscopy of atomically precise graphene nanoribbons

Posted by in categories: materials, physics

When physicist Tyler Cocker joined Michigan State University in 2018, he had a clear goal: build a powerful microscope that would be the first of its kind in the United States.

Having accomplished that, it was time to put the to work.

“We knew we had to do something useful,” said Cocker, Jerry Cowen Endowed Chair in Experimental Physics in the College of Natural Science’s Department of Physics and Astronomy. “We’ve got the nicest microscope in the country. We should use this to our advantage.”

Continue reading “Lightwave-driven scanning tunneling spectroscopy of atomically precise graphene nanoribbons” »

Nov 23, 2021

Blowing Up the Universe: BICEP3 Tightens the Bounds on Cosmic Inflation

Posted by in categories: cosmology, physics

A new analysis of the South Pole-based telescope’s cosmic microwave background observations has all but ruled out several popular models of inflation.

Physicists looking for signs of primordial gravitational waves by sifting through the earliest light in the cosmos – the cosmic microwave background (CMB) – have reported their findings: still nothing.

But far from being a dud, the latest results from the BICEP3 experiment at the South Pole have tightened the bounds on models of cosmic inflation, a process that in theory explains several perplexing features of our universe and which should have produced gravitational waves shortly after the universe began.

Continue reading “Blowing Up the Universe: BICEP3 Tightens the Bounds on Cosmic Inflation” »

Nov 21, 2021

4 of Physics’ (Other) Greatest Mysteries

Posted by in categories: cosmology, physics

Physicists are interested in the big questions like “Where did we come from?” and “What is all this stuff?”. But the answers to some of these questions, just lead to more questions.

Hosted by: Michael Aranda.

Continue reading “4 of Physics’ (Other) Greatest Mysteries” »

Nov 21, 2021

Understanding the early universe depends on estimating the lifespan of neutrons

Posted by in categories: cosmology, physics

When we look into the night sky, we see the universe as it once was. We know that in the past, the universe was once warmer and denser than it is now. When we look deep enough into the sky, we see the microwave remnant of the big bang known as the cosmic microwave background. That marks the limit of what we can see. It marks the extent of the observable universe from our vantage point.

The cosmic background we observe comes from a time when the universe was already about 380,000 years old. We can’t directly observe what happened before that. Much of the earlier period is fairly well understood given what we know about physics, but the earliest moments of the big bang remain a bit of a mystery. According to the , the earliest moments of the universe were so hot and dense that even the fundamental forces of the acted differently than they do now. To better understand the big bang, we need to better understand these forces.

One of the more difficult forces to understand is the . Unlike more familiar forces such as gravity and electromagnetism, the weak is mostly seen through its effect of radioactive decay. So we can study the weak by measuring the rate at which things decay. But there’s a problem when it comes to neutrons.

Nov 20, 2021

How to See Black Holes + Kugelblitz Challenge Answer | Space Time | PBS Digital Studios

Posted by in categories: cosmology, mapping, physics

Viewers like you help make PBS (Thank you 😃). Support your local PBS Member Station here: https://to.pbs.org/DonateSPACE

Find out how scientists are mapping the black holes throughout the Milky Way and beyond as well as the answer to the Escape the Kugelblitz Challenge Question. Were you able to save humanity?

Continue reading “How to See Black Holes + Kugelblitz Challenge Answer | Space Time | PBS Digital Studios” »

Nov 20, 2021

Should We Build a Dyson Sphere? | Space Time | PBS Digital Studios

Posted by in categories: cosmology, physics

To check out any of the lectures available from Great Courses Plus go to http://ow.ly/Y8lm303oKJe.

SXSW Panel Picker Sign-up: https://panelpicker.sxsw.com/vote/68148

Continue reading “Should We Build a Dyson Sphere? | Space Time | PBS Digital Studios” »

Nov 20, 2021

Joscha Bach — Reconciling consciousness with physicalism

Posted by in categories: cosmology, neuroscience, physics

Speaking at the 6th International FQXi Conference, “Mind Matters: Intelligence and Agency in the Physical World.”

The Foundational Questions Institute (FQXi) catalyzes, supports, and disseminates research on questions at the foundations of physics and cosmology, particularly new frontiers and innovative ideas integral to a deep understanding of reality but unlikely to be supported by conventional funding sources.

Continue reading “Joscha Bach — Reconciling consciousness with physicalism” »

Nov 19, 2021

The technology we (or aliens) need for long-distance interstellar travel

Posted by in categories: physics, space travel

Solutions to the problems of interstellar travel

Given the insane scale of interstellar distances, how might we extrapolate from the physics we do understand to envisioning possible ways that aliens (or us in the future) could cross the cosmic void? There are a few possible solutions to the problem of interstellar travel.

Nov 18, 2021

There’s One Thing Futurists are Never Wrong About

Posted by in categories: futurism, physics

A bold claim, I know. It won’t surprise you to find out that I want to stick some qualifiers on it. For the purposes of this article, “futurists” means educated industry analysts and hard science fiction authors with a comprehensive knowledge of physics.

Page 1 of 16112345678Last