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Nov 24, 2021

We might not know half of what’s in our cells, new AI technique reveals

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, chemistry, media & arts, robotics/AI

Most human diseases can be traced to malfunctioning parts of a cell—a tumor is able to grow because a gene wasn’t accurately translated into a particular protein or a metabolic disease arises because mitochondria aren’t firing properly, for example. But to understand what parts of a cell can go wrong in a disease, scientists first need to have a complete list of parts.

By combining microscopy, biochemistry techniques and , researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and collaborators have taken what they think may turn out to be a significant leap forward in the understanding of human cells.

The technique, known as Multi-Scale Integrated Cell (MuSIC), is described November 24, 2021 in Nature.

Nov 20, 2021

Why Is The Universe Out Of Balance?

Posted by in categories: cosmology, media & arts

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Researched and Written by JD Voyek.
Narrated and Edited by David Kelly.
Thumbnail Art by Ettore Mazza.

Continue reading “Why Is The Universe Out Of Balance?” »

Nov 19, 2021

Favorite Music Can Improve Brain Function In Alzheimer’s Disease

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, media & arts, neuroscience

Over the past few years, scientists have been trying to understand how listening to music affects your brain. One of the features of music that seems to be important is whether you have an emotional connection to it. In other words, listening to a favorite tune will have a different effect on your brain than an unknown or disliked piece of music.

Now, a new study has shown that people with Alzheimer’s Disease can improve their cognition by listening to music that has personal meaning to them, such as songs they’ve been listening to for years.

Researchers Corinne Fischer, Nathan Churchill and colleagues from the University of Toronto ran a small study to find out what exactly happens when people with Alzheimer’s listened to their favorite songs. They asked fourteen people with early stage Alzheimer’s Disease to spend one hour per day listening to music they enjoyed and were very familiar with. Before and after the test period all participants also took a cognitive test, and had their brain activity measured by functional MRI (fMRI).

Nov 19, 2021

Apple Is Heavily Working On Its Fully Autonomous Car, Per New Report

Posted by in categories: media & arts, mobile phones, robotics/AI, sustainability, transportation, wearables

The team has set an internal deadline of 2025.

In a move that could peg it against electric vehicle market leader, Tesla, Apple has begun working aggressively on its fully autonomous electric car, Bloomberg reported. Developing a car has been on Apple’s agenda since 2014 but recent moves within the company signal a push towards making an Apple car a reality.

Given Apple’s history of taking regularly used products and transforming them into their must-have versions using excellent design, it is hardly a surprise. With Steve Jobs at the helm of affairs, Apple made the iPod even when music players were ubiquitous. Then the company revealed the iPhone when Nokia was still selling resistive touch screens as its premium product. And recently, the Apple Watch has become the “it” wearable even though there are other smartwatch options in the market. During a time where electric vehicles are in a surge, it only seems natural that the electric car is Apple’s next target.

Nov 19, 2021

Meet the Gen Z founders who created a music app to help combat pandemic-induced anxiety and depression

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, business, media & arts, neuroscience

Name: Travis Chen and Brian Femminella

Age: 22 and 21

Location: Seattle, Washington; Los Angeles, California.

Continue reading “Meet the Gen Z founders who created a music app to help combat pandemic-induced anxiety and depression” »

Nov 18, 2021

Adding Sound to Quantum Simulations: Creating a Lattice of Light and Atoms That Can Vibrate

Posted by in categories: media & arts, particle physics, quantum physics

Aiming to emulate the quantum characteristics of materials more realistically, researchers have figured out a way to create a lattice of light and atoms that can vibrate – bringing sound to an otherwise silent experiment.

When sound was first incorporated into movies in the 1920s, it opened up new possibilities for filmmakers such as music and spoken dialogue. Physicists may be on the verge of a similar revolution, thanks to a new device developed at Stanford University that promises to bring an audio dimension to previously silent quantum science experiments.

In particular, it could bring sound to a common quantum science setup known as an optical lattice, which uses a crisscrossing mesh of laser beams to arrange atoms in an orderly manner resembling a crystal. This tool is commonly used to study the fundamental characteristics of solids and other phases of matter that have repeating geometries. A shortcoming of these lattices, however, is that they are silent.

Continue reading “Adding Sound to Quantum Simulations: Creating a Lattice of Light and Atoms That Can Vibrate” »

Nov 17, 2021

Elon Musk’s Revolutionary NEW School Revealed!

Posted by in categories: bitcoin, education, Elon Musk, media & arts, robotics/AI, space travel

Ad Astra School is the experimental school that Elon Musk started in one of SpaceX’s factories to give an education to his own children and selected children of SpaceX employees. The future of work will require a set of skills that are not taught in schools today. The future of work will involve robots and Artificial Intelligence collaborating with humans. The Astra Nova School’s pillars include caring about community, focusing on student experiences, and sharing the work they do with the world.
Here students learn about simulations, case studies, fabrication and design projects, labs, and corporate collaboration. In general, school systems are rigid. They are more system-centric than student-centric. Astra Nova is changing that by creating a philosophy of student centricity, a value for individual abilities, praising curiosity, and encouraging problem-solving and critical thinking.
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Nov 10, 2021

Adding sound to quantum simulations

Posted by in categories: media & arts, particle physics, quantum physics

When sound was first incorporated into movies in the 1920s, it opened up new possibilities for filmmakers such as music and spoken dialogue. Physicists may be on the verge of a similar revolution, thanks to a new device developed at Stanford University that promises to bring an audio dimension to previously silent quantum science experiments.

In particular, it could bring sound to a common quantum science setup known as an , which uses a crisscrossing mesh of laser beams to arrange atoms in an orderly manner resembling a crystal. This tool is commonly used to study the fundamental characteristics of solids and other phases of matter that have repeating geometries. A shortcoming of these lattices, however, is that they are silent.

“Without sound or vibration, we miss a crucial degree of freedom that exists in real materials,” said Benjamin Lev, associate professor of applied physics and of physics, who set his sights on this issue when he first came to Stanford in 2011. “It’s like making soup and forgetting the salt; it really takes the flavor out of the quantum ‘soup.’”.

Nov 9, 2021

Visualizing Audio With An LCD VU Meter

Posted by in categories: electronics, media & arts

We all love seeing data represented in pretty ways — whether it’s necessary or not. Take VU meters for example. They’re a super useful tool for audio editors to balance signals, but they also look really cool, even if you’re only listening to music. Who didn’t use a Winamp skin with a built-in VU meter back in the day? Even after the demise of everyone’s favorite media player, we still see these great graphs popping up all over the place.

Most recently, we’ve seen VU meters circle back around to have a bit of a retro vibe in this awesome Arduino-controlled LCD VU meter built by [mircemk]. Based on the KTAudio VU Meter project, it features an ultra-wide LCD, audio input, and volume knob, all tidily wrapped up in a case whose color scheme that can only conjure images of the famed Altair 8800, or an old Tektronix oscilloscope. The LCD itself is fairly responsive — but you can judge for yourself in the video below. The signature fading that so commonly accompanies screen refreshes on LCDs such as this one really adds to the retro effect.

Continue reading “Visualizing Audio With An LCD VU Meter” »

Nov 8, 2021

BREAKTHROUGH: Scientists Reverse Blindness [CRISPR Technology]

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, business, media & arts

CRISPR Gene editing therapy is used for the first time in living humans with amazing results.

— About ColdFusion –
ColdFusion is an Australian based online media company independently run by Dagogo Altraide since 2009. Topics cover anything in science, technology, history and business in a calm and relaxed environment.

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